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Springing Into Outdoor Dining

Spring is here! Has your outdoor patio opened up to the public. Were you ready for it? Outdoor dining is an experience more and more customers are craving. Especially when the warm spring days emerge. Diners take it upon themselves to enjoy the outdoor spaces that many restaurants are now offering. But what happens when your space is not ready?  

Did the warm spring day come to a surprise or did the weatherman miss the target entirely. Whatever the reason, don’t let your customers’ experience be less than satisfactory. Have your bartenders be on top of their game even when that outdoor bar cooler is not temping or the doors wont shut because the cooler door hinges broke in the winter. Don’t let your diners see the aggravation or frustration that the staff is going through to serve them…the customer. Offer a complimentary appetizer or dessert to make up for lag time when service is less than adequate.

Empower your employees. Have servers, bar tenders, line cooks, bar backs (you name it) make a list of items that are failing in the restaurant. Keep a dry erase board readily available so employees can add to the repair list. Use this list to get your outdoor space adequately up and running! Have back of the house managers and front of the house managers replace the items on the list ASAP! Employees can only hold it together for so long before the diners begin suffer. Stay on top of your kitchen equipment!

Health Grades and Your Reputation

food-safetyDo you feel chills down your spine when the Health Inspector calls? Is it because you know that there are things that need fixing that you just haven’t gotten around to or corners that you regularly cut just to save a few minutes. Getting a somewhat less than (let’s face it) A Grade on your report does not simply mean that you’ll get it right the next time or that it’s just a slap on the wrist. In this day & age of Social Media you are held accountable by more than a Health Inspector posting a grade on your door doing their job for public health.

Word of mouth spreads like rapid wildfire. I belong to a Social Media Group that has roughly 6,000 local residents in it. A member posted an article written by the local Journal (which was probably initially missed by most) about restaurants/bars/cafe’s/C-Stores in the area that have had health code violations within the passed 3 years. That’s right, 3 years. The  article listed roughly 20 establishments and all of their infractions. For the last 3 years! In a previous day and age this article might have gotten a small amount of attention but now that EVERYTHING has become digital things spread quick and at a large scale.

This article received a grandiose amount of attention (all of which was negative) and was re-posted to people outside of the group. If 20% of the people in the group looked at the post and of that 20% half of those people share the article and half of those people and so on and so on…who are all local current or potential customers to the listed establishments are reading this horrible article forming bad opinions. And we are not even talking about the traditional word of mouth! What happens to current or future clientele? Would you want to go somewhere if there is a possibility of getting sick?

In return, these restaurants will suffer and suffer at a large scale for something that they thought wasn’t a big deal. They might have not wanted to replace their damaged cooler door gaskets just yet or thought that they could get by when their thermostat wasn’t temping. Some of these easy fixes don’t even cost money like labeling food properly! Do not let your cafe’, hotel, bar, CSR, restaurant, or even taco truck fail! Be vigilant on keeping your establishment in good standing. Perception is reality. It is nearly impossible to recover from a generalized bad perception of a establishment.

Eliminate. The. Wait.

Get The Products You Need FASTER.

Hinged Parts ships the same day on all in-stock items. With multiple shipping points Nationwide, this means that you GET the PARTS that YOU NEED within 2-3 business DAYS. Many times you get them the NEXT DAY without having to upgrade your shipping service! This means NO EXTRA COST and no downtime!

So…worry less. Hinged Parts has your back. We get you back on track faster to working in kitchens doing what you do best!

Give us a call     844.292.6694
Visit us online  Hingedparts.com
Email us             Support@Hingedparts.com

 

Happy Cooking!

Presidential Trivia 101

Hingedparts.com
is celebrating Presidents Day with TRIVIA!!!!

  1. Who was the youngest President to be elected into office?
    –  John F. Kennedy (43 yrs. old)
  2. Who was the oldest President to be elected into office?
     – Donald Trump (70 yrs. old)
  3. How many US Presidents are currently living?
     – 6 ( Donald Trump, Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton, George H. W. Bush,  and Jimmy Carter)
  4. Who was the tallest President?
     – Abraham Lincoln
  5. Which President served more than 2 terms in office? 
    – Franklin D. Roosevelt
  6. Which President Held his daughters prom in the White House?
     – Gerald Ford
  7. Who was the first president to be born an American Citizen?
     – Martin Van Buren (all of the previous Presidents were from British Colonies)
  8. Which President served the shortest term?
    – William Henry Harrison (31 days – died of Pneumonia in office)
  9. Which President never married?
     – James Buchanan
  10. What are the desired qualifications to become president?
    – Education: No education is required but an advanced degree is preferred from a
    nationally-renowned university in the US.
     – Experience: Public office service is preferred, but not required.
  11. What are the required qualifications to be president?
    – 35 years or older, Born in the US, Resident of US for at least 14 years or more
  12. How much $$$ does the president make annually? 
    – $4,000.00
  13. True or False – Any plane the President is on is called “Air Force One”.
    -True
  14. Who was the first President who was son of a President?
    – John Quincy Adams (son of 2nd President John Adams) 
  15. Which President chose to be sworn in on the book of law as opposed to the Bible?
    – John Quincy Adams (he wanted to swear upon the Constitution)

 

 

Ready Your Restaurant

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Valentines Day is right around the corner. The worst thing that can happen is your commercial kitchen equipment breaking down. What would you do if suddenly your freezers weren’t temping because of a bad thermostat or your grill smoke started to over take the kitchen because your baffles need replacing. Catastrophes like walk-in cooler doors falling off of their hinges are preventable.

Restaurant managers/owners/chefs need to “check out” their equipment before any Holiday to avoid a potential nightmare for the restaurant. Holidays are busy enough in the back and front of the house, don’t make everyones temperature over boil by having a (preventable) kitchen meltdown.

Use the check list below to gain a piece of mind that your kitchen will function properly:

Door Hinges
Door Gaskets
Door Latches/Handles
Drawer Slides/Rails/Rollers
Heating Elements
Thermostats
Thermometers/Alarms
Grease Filters
Faucets
Water Filters
Switches

There still is time to get your replacement parts in before the Valentines Day rush. Call 844.292.6694 or go to HingedParts.com to order today!

Gear Up For Summer

Anti-Insect PVC Strips protect against ZIKA Virus

Many Companies (including restaurants, hotels, farms, refrigerated warehouses, food manufacturing facilities, etc.) are using Hinged Parts Anti-Insect Yellow PVC Strips to repel mosquitoes away from the door opening and prevent insects from entering their facility.  This exclusive product contains Citronella, a naturally occurring oil found in lemongrass, which gives off a specific smell that mosquitoes (and other flying insects) hate.  Mosquitoes will not land on the curtain due to the scent.  Also, the yellow color inhibits the insect’s ability to detect light, preventing the attraction that usually occurs after dark.  To a mosquito, this shade of yellow is opaque.

As the ZIKA virus spreads into the United States, it will be more critical than ever to protect employees and customers from mosquitoes in companies across all industry sectors. Our Anti-Insect Yellow PVC Strips provide an extra layer of security at the back door to keep mosquitoes out of the facility.

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Food For Thought

Food Safety Guidelines For Your Restaurant

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration regulates restaurants and distributes guidelines for safe food preparation & storage. The 2013 Food Code is the most recent full edition published by FDA. The code applies to > 1 million restaurants, grocery stores, & institutions (including schools and hospitals). Local, state, tribal, and federal regulators use the FDA Food Code as a model to develop or update their own food safety rules and to be consistent with national food regulatory policy. The 2013 Food Code as statutes, codes and ordinances include:

  • Reduction of the risk of food-borne illnesses within food establishments, thus protecting consumers and industry from potentially devastating health consequences and financial losses.
  • Uniform standards for retail food safety that reduce complexity and better ensure compliance.
  • The elimination of redundant processes for establishing food safety criteria.
  • The establishment of a more standardized approach to inspections and audits of food establishments.

Food Preparation

The FDA recommends operators focus on three food preparation processes:
– No-cook foods
– Same day service foods
– Foods with complex preparation

Foods in each process pass through the danger zone a different number of times. The pathogen temperature danger zone is between 41 F  – 135 F .

Personal Contact

Restaurant workers also can spread food borne illnesses, the FDA recommends 4 key safety precautions.
– Food should not be touched with bare hands (use food safe gloves).
– Workers should practice proper hand washing procedures.
– Sick employees should be excluded or restricted from food preparation.
– Workers should prevent cross-contamination by keeping ready-to-eat food and sanitized food-contact surfaces apart from raw animal foods or dirty surfaces & other objects.

Food Storage

Storing food at proper temperatures helps eliminate biological hazards, which include bacterial, viral and parasitic microorganisms. Restaurant kitchen staff should be well versed in safe practices, and kitchens should have signs posted that list safe procedures and storage temperatures for all types of food.

Food Allergies

This list includes milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, & soybeans. Notifying customers about the presence of these foods may cut down on adverse reactions.

Happy December First!

Yes, Winter is upon us and YES  periodic maintenance has to still be done. Commercial refrigeration equipment need to be maintained in all year round. Different seasons have different effects on your equipment. The best thing to do is have a PM schedule (or periodic maintenance schedule). (according to Heatcraft’s Operations Manual)

Unit Coolers 

At least every 6 months – (or sooner)

1) Visually inspect unit
• Look for signs of corrosion on fins, cabinet, copper tubing and solder joints.
• Look for excessive or unusual vibration for fan blades or sheet metal panels when in operation. Identify fan cell(s) causing vibration and check motor and blade carefully.
• Look for oil stains on headers, return bends, and coil fins. Check any suspect areas with an electronic leak detector.
• Check drain pan to insure that drain is clear of debris, obstructions or ice buildup and is free draining.

2) Clean evaporator coil and blades
• Periodic cleaning can be accomplished by using a brush, pressurized water or a commercially available evaporator coil cleaner or mild detergent. Never use an acid based cleaner. Follow label directions for appropriate use. Be sure the product you use is approved for use in your particular application.
• Flush and rinse coil until no residue remains.
• Pay close attention to drain pan, drain line and trap.

3) Check the operation of all fans and ensure airflow is unobstructed
• Check that each fan rotates freely and quietly. Replace any fan motor that does not rotate smoothly or makes an unusual noise.
• Check all fan set screws and tighten if needed.
• Check all fan blades for signs of stress or wear. Replace any blades that are worn, cracked or bent.
• Verify that all fan motors are securely fastened to the motor rail.
• Lubricate motors if applicable.

4) Inspect electrical wiring and components
• Visually inspect all wiring for wear, kinks, bare areas and discoloration. Replace any wiring found to be damaged.
• Verify that all electrical and ground connections are secure, tighten if necessary.
• Check operation/calibration of all fan cycle and defrost controls when used.
• Look for abnormal accumulation of ice patterns and adjust defrost cycles accordingly
• Compare actual defrost heater amp draw against unit data plate.
• Visually inspect heaters to ensure even surface contact with the coil. If heaters have crept, decrease defrost termination temperature and be sure you have even coil frost patterns. Re-align heaters as needed.
• Check drain line heat tape for proper operation (supplied and installed by others).

5) Refrigeration Cycle
• Check unit cooler superheat and compare reading for your specific application
• Visually inspect coil for even distribution

Air Cooled Condensing Units

Quarterly

1) Visually inspect unit

• Look for signs of oil stains on interconnection piping and condenser coil. Pay close attention to areas around solder joints, building penetrations and pipe clamps. Check any suspect areas with an electronic leak detector. Repair any leaks found and add refrigerant as needed.
• Check condition of moisture indicator/sightglass in the sight glass if so equipped. Replace liquid line drier if there is indication of slight presence of moisture. Replace refrigerant, oil and drier if moisture concentration is indicated to be high.
• Check moisture indicator/sightglass for flash gas. If found check entire system for refrigerant leaks and add refrigerant as needed after repairing any leaks.
• Check compressor sightglass (if equipped) for proper oil level.
• Check condition of condenser. Look for accumulation of dirt and debris (clean as required).
• Check for unusual noise or vibration. Take corrective action as required.
• Inspect wiring for signs of wear or discoloration and repair if needed.
• Check and tighten all flare connections.

Semi-Annually

2) Repeat all quarterly inspection items.

3) Clean condenser coil and blades

• Periodic cleaning can be accomplished by using a brush, pressurized water and a commercially available foam coil cleaner. If foam cleaner is used, it should not be an acid based cleaner. Follow label directions for appropriate use.
• Rinse until no residue remains.

4) Check operation of condenser fans

• Check that each fan rotates freely and quietly. Replace any fan motor that does not rotate smoothly or makes excessive noise.
• Check all fan blade set screws and tighten as required.
• Check all fan blades for signs of cracks, wear or stress. Pay close attention to the hub and spider. Replace blades as required.
• Verify that all motors are mounted securely.
• Lubricate motors if applicable. Do not lubricate permanently sealed, ball bearing motors.

5) Inspect electrical wiring and components

• Verify that all electrical and ground connections are secure, tighten as required.
• Check condition of compressor and heater contactors. Look for discoloration and pitting. Replace as required.
• Check operation and calibration of all timers, relays pressure controls and safety controls.
• Clean electrical cabinet. Look for signs of moisture, dirt, debris, insects and wildlife. Take corrective action as required.
• Verify operation of crankcase heater by measuring amp draw.

6) Check refrigeration cycle

• Check suction, discharge and net oil pressure readings. If abnormal take appropriate action.
• Check operation of demand cooling, liquid injection or unloaders if so equipped.
• Check pressure drop across all filters and driers. Replace as required.
• Verify that superheat at the compressor conforms to specification. (30°F to 45°F)
• Check pressure and safety control settings and verify proper operation.

Annually

7) In addition to quarterly and semiannual maintenance checks, submit an oil sample for analysis

• Look for high concentrations of acid or moisture. Change oil and driers until test results read normal.
• Investigate source of high metal concentrations, which normally are due to abnormal bearing wear. Look for liquid refrigerant in the crankcase, low oil pressure or low superheat as a possible source.

8 ) Inspect suction accumulator (if equipped)

• If the accumulator is insulated remove insulation and inspect for leaks and corrosion.
• Pay close attention to all copper to steel brazed connections
• Wire brush all corroded areas and peeling paint.
• Apply an anti-corrosion primer and paint as required. Re-insulate if applicable.

Air Cooled Condensers and Fluid Coolers

At every six month interval, or sooner if local conditions cause clogging or fouling of air passages through the finned surface, the following items should be checked.

1) Visually inspect unit

• Look for signs of corrosion on fins, cabinet, copper tubing and solder joints.
• Look for excessive or unusual vibration for fan blades or sheet metal panels when in operation. Identify fan cell(s) causing vibration and check motor and blade carefully.
• Look for oil stains on headers, return bends, and coil fins. Check any suspect areas with an electronic leak detector.

2) Clean condenser coil and blades

• Periodic cleaning can be accomplished by using brush, pressurized water or a commercially available coil cleaning foam. If a foam cleaner is used, it should not be an acid based cleaner. Follow label directions for appropriate use.
• Clear unnecessary trash and debris away from condenser.

3) Check the operation of all fans

• Check that each fan rotates freely and quietly. Replace any fan motor that does not rotate smoothly or makes an unusual noise.
• Check all fan set screws and tighten if needed.
• Check all fan blades for signs of stress or wear. Replace any blades that are worn, cracked or bent.
• Verify that all fan motors are securely fastened to the motor rail.
• Lubricate motors if applicable (most Heatcraft condenser motors are permanently sealed ball bearing type and do not require lubrication)

4) Inspect electrical wiring and components

• Visually inspect all wiring for wear, kinks, bare areas and discoloration. Replace any wiring found to be damaged.
• Verify that all electrical and ground connections are secure, tighten if necessary.
• Check operation/calibration of all fan cycle controls when used.

 

How To Identify Your Door Gasket

Lost in The Mess and Madness of Rubber? 

Identifying your cooler and freezer door gaskets do not have to be this hard. Certain cooler manufacturers only utilize certain gasket profiles (or shapes) on their units. So do not get discouraged! Hinged has put together a reference on identifying your gasket according to its manufacturer. We have removed the pain in the gasket discovery process! ALSO REMEMBER – WE CAN MANUFACTURE ANY SIZE ANY STYLE. Please call 844.292.6694 or E-mail for details. *Please note gasket seal images are ABOVE their description. Some gasket profiles are available in santoprene for higher temp. applications such as warmers.



Door Gasket D2076 | Magnetic screw-in gasket. Delfield & some others. Can be swapped by the U2250

Door Gasket C10095 | Magnetic screw-in gasket. Duke, Tyler, Victory, Nor-Lake, Howard-McCray, & others.


Door Gasket U2250 | Magnetic screw-in gasket. Delfield , Randell, Victory, Utility & many others. This “Universal” gasket can be put on almost anything that is in very bad condition that the original profile will not work.


Door Gasket S2208 | Magnetic screw-in gasket. Traulsen, Carter-Hoffman, Federal & some others. Low profile magnetic screw-in gasket. Used on doors with narrow offset. If the door is not perfectly straight & there is space, use U2250.


Door Gasket H2211 | Magnetic panel-mount gasket. Hobart, Vulcan-Hart, Utility, & others. Gasket has some stretch & should be made a little small for a snug fit.

Door Gasket S2396 | Compression screw-in gasket. Brown, Traulsen, Bev-Air, Hobart, Atlas, & many others. Very common used on many varieties of OEM and custom equipment.

Door Gasket L082 | Compression screw-in gasket. Hobart, Bev-Air, & more. Same as above, but slightly thicker. Be careful not to use this on an old door that is close on the hinge side. It is hard to compress and requires a lot of heat.

Door Gasket V2328 | Compression snap in gasket. Jordon & Victory coolers and freezers.

Door Gasket D2079 | Magnetic press in gasket. Common on Delfield & other freezers, warmers, & coolers.

Door Gasket U9532 | Magnetic Press-in Gasket. Common on Continental, Hobart, Kairak, Masterbilt, Randell, & many others. Most universal dart mounted gasket. Easy to install with our tools.


Door Gasket G9527 |  Magnetic press-in gasket. Common on Glenco, Bev-Air , Traulsen, & many others. Similar to the U9532 but the magnet chamber is in the center of the gasket.


Door Gasket B9555 | Large magnetic press-in gasket. Found on Victory , Glenco, Traulsen & other commercial refrigeration units. This gasket is thicker, harder and overall larger than the U9532.


Door Gasket H9539 | Magnetic press-in gasket. Triple dart gasket common on Howard-McCray, Bally, Brown, & many more commercial freezers and coolers.

Door Gasket S10054 | Magnetic press-in gasket. Commonly found on Barr, Schaefer & other cooler and freezer commercial kitchen units.

Door Gasket K9525 | Magnetic press-in gasket. Common on KolpakVollrath commercial refrigerator freezer units.

Door Gasket H2327 | Magnetic push-in gasket.  On Foster & Hobart commercial refrigerator freezer units. Can replace other press-in seals that have wide track.

Door Gasket D2049 | Magnetic push-in gasket. Seal profile common on older Delfield commercial refrigeration and freezer units.

Door Gasket D2074 | Magnetic push-in gasket. Seal profile commonly found on Delfield commercial refrigerator freezer units.

Door Gasket R2257 | Magnetic push-in gasket. Common on Randell commercial refrigeration and freezer units.

Door Gasket T2213 | Magnetic push-in gasket. Found on Traulsen commercial refrigeration and freezer units. Original gasket is foamed in place. Installation of these gaskets may be difficult.

Door Gasket T9541 | Magnetic press-in gasket. Gasket seal found on older (<2005) True reach-in commercial refrigeration units.

Door Gasket H2278 | Magnetic push-in gasket. Gasket seal common on Hussmann Innovator doors.

Glass Door Gasket A2262 | Magnetic panel-mount gasket. Glass door gasket seal common on Anthony & Zero-Zone commercial refrigerator freezer units. Anthony model 101 door mounted gasket.

Glass Door Gasket A2428 | Magnetic press-in Gasket. Glass door gasket seal common on Anthony & McCall commercial refrigerator freezer units.

Glass Door Gasket U2260 | Magnetic push-in gasket. Glass door gasket seal Anthony, Biloff, Hussmann, Kelvinator , Leer, Masterbilt, Schaefer, Tyler, Vulcan, & other cooler/freezer units.

Glass Door Gasket A9536 | Magnetic press-in gasket. Anthony frame mounted Gaskets for display units. “New” style frame mounted gaskets for doors manufactured after Nov. 1981. Most installations also need retainers, use retainer profile A2286.

Glass Door Gasket U9535 | Magnetic snap-in gasket. Gasket seal common on Ardco, Hobart/Koch, McCall, Nor-Lake, & Pinnacle commercial refrigeration and freezer units.

Glass Door Gasket A2261 | Magnetic press-in gasket. Anthony frame mounted commercial refrigeration and freezer units. “Old” style frame mounted gaskets for doors manufactured prior to Nov. 1981, uses retainer 2310.

Door Gasket T2458 | Magnetic push-in gasket. Found on newer True commercial refrigerator freezer units (>2005). Similar to the 2563 except the dart is larger and offset more to the side.

Door Gasket T2563 | Magnetic push-in gasket. Found on newer True commercial cooler units (>2005). Don’t confuse with the T2458 this gasket is a little larger and the dart is closer to the center.

Door Gasket D122 | Magnetic Push-in gasket. Common on Delfield coolers and freezers.

Door Gasket U2209 |  Magnetic press-in gasket. Found on True, Perlick, Universal-Nolin, Bev-Air, and many others.

Door Gasket S383 | Magnetic Push-in Gasket. Door seal common on SilverKing coolers and freezers. Profile also available in santoprene for warmer applications up to 275 degrees F.

Door Gasket T425 | Magnetic Push-in seal. Door gasket commonly found on Turbo air and Masterbilt.

Door Gasket G285 | Magnetic Panel-mount gasket seal. Common on glass door applications for Styleline, Victory, McCall, Leer, Zero Zone, & some other commercial refrigeration units. Seal must be measured exact.

Door Gasket B5583 | Magnetic Panel-mount gasket. Door seal common on Barr refrigeration coolers and freezers.

Glass Door Retainer A2286 | Use with gasket A9536. For Anthony model 1001 glass display doors 20-11399-1069.

Glass Door Retainer A2310 | Use with gasket A2261. For Anthony model 1000 glass display doors

20-11376-1056.

Neoprene Sweep | Generic walk-in door sweep 3″ wide x 1/16″ thick.

Adhesive Backed Flange Gasket Seal |  Temp range is -30  to 150F.

D-Bulb Door Gasket Seal | Temp range -30 to 200F.

Adhesive backed EDPM bar roll gasket |  Available in various sizes and lengths. Weather and abrasion resistant. Temp range -10 to 150F.

High-temp Silicone Adhesive Backed Gasket Seal | Available in various sizes and lengths.

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